The war of art steven pressfield ebook

 

    Editorial Reviews. From Publishers Weekly. Novelist Steven Pressfield (The Legend of Bagger Advanced Search. Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Self-Help. Ebook Distribution By. FastPencil PREMIERE Steven Pressfield wrote The War of Art for me. He To begin Book One, Pressfield labels the enemy of creativity. The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles - Ebook written by Steven Pressfield. Read this book using Google Play Books.

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    The War Of Art Steven Pressfield Ebook

    Read "The War of Art Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles" by Steven Pressfield available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get. The War of Art: Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles. Front Cover · Steven Pressfield. Black Irish Entertainment LLC, Jun 3, I had just received the umpteenth note—this time via Facebook—from a frustrated reader who was trying to order the Kindle eBook of The War of Art. (The.

    Shelves: contemporary , nonfiction , finished-in Holden Caulfield would love this, as would Ernest Hemingway. HC had it in for the phonies, and Pressfield has no use for them, either. Only he's met the enemy and it is himself. And you, gentle reader, need only a mirror to find your enemy. Pressfield calls it "Resistance," and it lurks in all of us. What's more, it's every excuse you can possibly think of to delay doing what the Muse put you on this earth to do: procrastination, rationalizations, physical sicknesses, psychological conditions wi Holden Caulfield would love this, as would Ernest Hemingway. What's more, it's every excuse you can possibly think of to delay doing what the Muse put you on this earth to do: procrastination, rationalizations, physical sicknesses, psychological conditions with funny letters, family, drama, Twitter, Facebook, busywork, alcohol, drugs, television, your cellphone, fatigue, hopelessness, etc.

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    The War of Art : Break Through the Blocks and Win Your Inner Creative Battles

    Creating Character Arcs: The Motivation Manifesto. Brendon Burchard. Jack Canfield. Waking Up. Sam Harris. Live a Meaningful Life. Joshua Fields Millburn. How to Make a Living with Your Writing: Books, Blogging and More.

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    Simone de Beauvoir. Love Warrior. Glennon Doyle. The Happiness Equation. Neil Pasricha. Dan Harris. Elon Musk. Ashlee Vance. Nonviolent Communication: A Language of Life, 3rd Edition. Marshall B. Never Split the Difference. Chris Voss. The Achievement Habit. Bernard Roth. The Fire Starter Sessions. The Practicing Mind. Thomas M. Adam Grant. Basically, Pressfield says you gotta do the hard stuff. You gotta work. Ignore distractions and do what it is you want to do, that you dream of doing, NOW.

    That's it really. It's more than worth the price of admission for anyone in a creative field. Clear, inspiring, and short. Also, inexpensive, which seems remarkably fair in this era. Yes, roughly half of the book is a little More Pressfield's life philosophy and spirituality than anything, and not helpful to me. But I'm not going to knock a star off it for that. I've read too many business books that are 15 pages of gold surrounded by pages of fluff to get angry when an author legitimat It's more than worth the price of admission for anyone in a creative field.

    I've read too many business books that are 15 pages of gold surrounded by pages of fluff to get angry when an author legitimately gives a work his all--and gives 50 pages of gold and 50 pages of Not For Me, Thanks. Where it's good, it's great. I highlighted many, many passages.

    It left me hungry to go do more work. View all 3 comments. Mar 10, David rated it really liked it Shelves: How creative of a person are you? Which can mean that you don't want to get out of you bed some days, or that you have the ability to procrastinate greatly, or that you want to destroy every piece of work that you have ever created because it's crap and you'll never be as crazy as Vincent van Gogh or as cool as Michaelangelo.

    Well, this book gives you tools to help you overcome all your short comings and own up to your potential as How creative of a person are you? Well, this book gives you tools to help you overcome all your short comings and own up to your potential as a creative member of society. Also, nobody wants to get out of bed in the morning, it's so comfortable and cozy in there.

    Let me know when we put a hybrid engine in a bed, I'll drive that to work. View 1 comment. Jul 12, Sam Quixote rated it it was ok. This slim volume is made up of three sections. The book is fairly well written and I agree with most of what Pressfield has to say about getting comfortable with the uncomfortable in order to progress, knuckling down and getting on with it, creating a routine, being patient, fighting apathy, not listening to any negativity in your head, etc.

    And the repetitive and tedious nature of the content makes for a very uninteresting read. Hello, my name is Makeba and it has been 22 days since I've thought about writing and decided to do something else instead. I write everyday, and this book helped me do it. She would invite me out and I'd decide to wash my hair instead. He would call and I'd push the button that sent it straight to voicemail.

    I was a lousy friend. Illuminating what Pressfield defines as resistance and turning pro turned the tables Hello, my name is Makeba and it has been 22 days since I've thought about writing and decided to do something else instead.

    Illuminating what Pressfield defines as resistance and turning pro turned the tables on myself and forced me to take a hard look at my habits and decide if I was hungry enough to change them. I'm on day three of beans and rice; I'm hungry. I started the book identifying with the person who wrote the forward-- a fellow procrastinator capable of banging out a decent product-- and finished it seeking ways to exhibit the same qualities Steven has-- discipline, integrity, and patience.

    Highly Recommended! Nov 27, Joe Barlow rated it did not like it. What a piece of garbage! The author of this new-ageish book repeatedly states opinion as fact, and proves himself to be a misguided and judgmental buffoon. Some of the things I "learned" while reading this meritless piece of tripe: Attention Deficit Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder aren't "real"--they are merely excuses that we give ourselves because we don't truly want to succeed; 2.

    The reason Hitler killed millions of Jews is because he didn't have a creative outlet, and he should have What a piece of garbage! The reason Hitler killed millions of Jews is because he didn't have a creative outlet, and he should have painted more; 3. Since creativity requires a healthy body as well as a healthy mind, overweight people cannot truly be creative. I am happy to report that this is false.

    Sounds like THIS fat man's creativity is working just fine. Sep 28, Elizabeth Scott rated it it was amazing. As some of you may have noticed, there's a book called The Midnight Disease listed as something I'm currently reading.

    I don't remember when I added it anymore, but I know it was a while ago. Nothing in them helped me. I went to different places to try and write. I made myself sit down with only my AlphaSmart and refused t As some of you may have noticed, there's a book called The Midnight Disease listed as something I'm currently reading.

    I made myself sit down with only my AlphaSmart and refused to get up for three hours or until I'd at least written something. The hours would pass, and I would write nothing.

    And then I'd cry. I was slowly but surely becoming convinced I'd never write again, and it broke my heart. All of me felt broken, actually And then I saw this book in my local bookstore and took a look at it. And what I read blew me away. Pressfield doesn't talk about specifically about writer's block but about Resistance, and the thing he said that made me download the book, take it home and read the first two sections over and over again the third one is about muses and things and I'm not into that was this: Every ounce of juice it possesses comes from us.

    We feed it by our very fear of it. But Pressfield got me to do that, and he got me to realize that it was my fears that were stopping me, and that writing can't be about overcoming everything that's got you trapped in a corner or scared. It has to--and must be--simply about the writing. It's not easy to overcome those fears, and I keep a copy of The War of Art next to what I'm currently working on, and turn to it when I need a reminder that it's okay to be afraid, and that the important thing is to keep going.

    Jul 26, Onaiza Khan rated it it was amazing Shelves: It is like a pocket map to find your inner Muse. It starts from a very basic level. Kind of like the layman level and drives you swiftly but efficiently to the level of an artist. Effortlessly leading you to your destination. Dec 30, Brandice rated it really liked it. Timely and Timeless! The book is full of ways to recognize and overcome roadblocks in the realm of creativity. While Pressfield often provides examples related to being a professional writer, the concepts can easily be applied to any professional discipline.

    The book is divided into 3 parts: I really enjoyed the first two sections, which I found preferable to the third, but the book is great all around. I could relate to many of the ways we let resistance impact us, but also could relate to some of the ways we distinguish professionals from amateurs. It is a timely read, as people often look to set new goals for a new year.

    It is timeless because the concepts - including the discipline required to succeed - ring true, again and again. He respects Resistance. He knows if he caves in today, no matter how plausible the pretext, he'll be twice as likely to cave in tomorrow. The professional knows that Resistance is like a telemarketer; if you so much as say hello, you're finished. The pro doesn't even pick up the phone.

    He stays at work. View all 6 comments. Oct 06, Madeline rated it did not like it. What a mess. This book is ridiculous. This book is angry. This book is upset that it had to be written because the author made himself think that he had to stay in a chair everyday writing regardless of however else he may have felt at the moment. This book is an awesome example of someone who apparently believes in the explicit value of free speech but denounces free will.

    I finished it a few days ago and have since been seriously trying to understand how it was published. FIrst of all, it's not What a mess. FIrst of all, it's not a book. It's an assortment of thoughts that seem to have spewed out of the authors mind in a frenzy. Probably due to some crazy circumstance that was way more interesting than anything written on the pages of the book itself. Was there an editor?

    Or even someone doing page layout? Or a fact checker? Was it self published? What's up with the one sentences taking up parts of entire pages as if it they are such epic thoughts that they deserve such suspension? I thought this book was going to provide practical advice on how to achieve a higher state of discipline. It doesn't.

    It does though attempt to bully you into fulfilling your 'purpose' as a creative being. According to the author we all have a purpose to fulfill and if we ignore it he will yell at us, like he does on the last page. That page is awesome. I wonder if this person is aware that some people actually do not have purposes, they were born and there is not one thing in the world that interests them, and it is not due to procrastination or resistance.

    I wonder what he thinks of such people who achieve nothing, nor care to and remain healthy their entire lives. I wonder what he thinks of teenagers who have never procrastinated a day in their lives and are diagnosed with cancer or mental disorders nonetheless. I wonder if he realizes that if someone is in tune with themselves that resistance and fear are on their side. Sep 24, Suzanne rated it did not like it Recommends it for: No one.

    In a word: I've suffered through 57 pages of being told I should resist resistance. Skipping ahead to page 68, I see a chapter on the value of being miserable.

    Just no. I'm done here. Oct 09, Leonard Gaya rated it liked it.

    Pressfield is a former Marine, the author of a novel on the Greco-Persian Wars and a fan of the Bhagavad Gita, so probably someone who's become an expert in getting one's shit together in the face of adversity.

    The books is divided into three sections: I have picked up this book from the shelf in order to get a boost for a writing project I'm working on and because it was prefaced by Robert McKee! Two sentences particularly remain on top of my mind: I need to begin now. Oct 05, Lee rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Writers, artists, entrepreneurs, anyone with a goal or project who needs motivation!

    This book is fierce. I picked it up late one night while fighting the flu and the next morning, I was like an efficient machine.

    I felt extremely motivated to continue my efforts on a few projects that had been languishing on the back burner. The author shines a very bright light on that cunning, rational voice we all have that convinces us to wait, procrastinate or never start a new venture.

    He calls it resistance and expounds that the greater resistance you have to something, the more importan This book is fierce. He calls it resistance and expounds that the greater resistance you have to something, the more important it must be. Written in concise chunks, some only a page or paragraph long, I was compelled to keep reading.

    The author's voice is refreshing and the ideas clear and relevant. That defeatist little voice better watch out! Mar 26, Shana rated it it was ok. I wasn't really sure what to expect when I read this quick read of a book. On the one hand, I appreciated the brevity and the candor, and on the other, the self-righteous overtones were alienating and borderline dictatorial.

    I don't underestimate the work ethic and writing talent of Mr. Pressfield; however, if you are looking for practical approaches to consistently battling your bouts of procrastination and creative blocks without sacrificing the relationships that matter most in life aka real I wasn't really sure what to expect when I read this quick read of a book.

    Pressfield; however, if you are looking for practical approaches to consistently battling your bouts of procrastination and creative blocks without sacrificing the relationships that matter most in life aka real friends and family , look elsewhere. What makes this book borderline off-putting is that the three contemporary male figures noted for their "acts of commitment," and are referenced more than once throughout, are all men that have failed their families and the public: In addition, it is darn near impossible to find anything from Mr.

    Pressfield regarding his commitment to his family, uncertain that he has one? It is a bit tough to swallow the words of an artist when the word commitment only applies when it is to serve your advantage. Mar 02, John Henry rated it it was ok. Two positive stars. It was okay. Maybe I've read too many books about writing. This is one of those paragraph-a-page books with quips about writing and overcoming what stands between you and getting it done.

    But I didn't find those pages all that inspiring or motivating and I kept wishing for funny photographs above each paragraph to help me turn the pages. It's one of those books that would benefit from polar bears and grasshoppers sitting at typewriters or somehow illustrating the text in a hu Two positive stars.

    It's one of those books that would benefit from polar bears and grasshoppers sitting at typewriters or somehow illustrating the text in a humorous way. Not a bad book, but maybe just not for me. Feb 11, Rachel rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: He focuses a lot on writing, but it clearly applies to anything you are called to do in your life, but seem unable to get yourself to do it.

    I have been working on-and-off on my 1st book for 5 years. I have had so much resistance to sitting down and writing, even though I love writing my blog pieces. He is a musician, a painter, a playwright. Resistance loves this. Resistance knows that the amateur composer will never write his symphony because he is overly invested in its success and overterrified of its failure.

    The amateur takes it so seriously it paralyzes him. How are you meant to deal with that? I fundamentally reject the idea that it is unprofessional to write for a living.

    The very definition of a professional writer is that of someone who is able to support themselves through their vocation. Is it immoral to write for a living?

    How do we define and balance love and too much love when it comes to our motives for writing? Is it not possible to write authentically and be paid for our efforts? Are writers supposed to make a living by just passively waiting for money to come their way, if and when they deserve it?

    I beg to differ. Writing is both art and work. And the fruits of our labour serve a purpose: These things enrichen our culture — and are worth paying for. The starving artist is not inherently noble.

    The War of Art - Compra Livros ou ebook na skinabnipartka.cf

    Neither have I. Resistance beat him. Just … what? First of all, Hitler produced hundreds of paintings. He was not creatively blocked. But obviously the bigger issue here is that this is not the reason World War II started.

    Steven Pressfield's the War of Art

    How about the signing of the Treaty of Versailles after World War I that crippled Germany financially and shamed them into eventually electing a leader that fed them a sense of national pride?

    How about the failure of the League of Nations? How about the fact that clearly Hitler was an inhuman megalomaniac monster? People recover. Is it possible […] that the disease itself evolved as a consequence of actions taken or not taken in our lives? Could our unlived lives have exacted their vengeance upon us in the form of cancer?

    And if they did, can we cure ourselves, now, by living these lives out? All those millions we spend on cancer research are clearly going to waste … Suggesting that people who do not answer their creative urges bring cancer upon themselves is, quite frankly, disgusting.

    The War of Art is written in broken, fragmented thoughts.

    And the ebook version I read was poorly laid out to the point I thought I had a defective copy. We get a snippet of information a page at a time; ideas are stretched out thinly, repeated, seemingly in a disjointed and random order, jumping back and forth between themselves, and lacking in analysis. He made that pile of pages into a story. His editor took a multitude of short pages containing random thoughts on writing and procrastination, and ordered them into a semblance of logic.

    There are snippets of value buried in this book. Anyone who has read books and blogs on writing and creativity will have come across them, in one shape or another. In short, this book is both absolutist and extremist. This book might be inspiring to others, but it failed to inspire me. What did you think of it? Let me know in the comments. Never miss a post.

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